Back to Basics: Volleyball Player Positions

Blurred image of girls playing volleyball

There are six positions on a volleyball court, and each position serves a unique role in the success of the team. Just like other competitive teams, you need to depend on each player to not only do their job but do their job well. Volleyball is extremely fast-paced and requires serious athletic ability. Depending on your skill-set and which aspect of the game you excel in the most, you can determine which of these six positions you will play. In today’s blog, Hoover Met Complex will break down each of these volleyball play positions.

Setter

The setter is the main contributor to the offense of the volleyball team. One of the requirements of the setter is having a delicate touch to set the ball perfectly for one of the attacking players. Communication is extremely important for the setter because they need to get the rest of the players on the same page. Without the setter, there wouldn’t be hard spikes or technical ball movement.

Outside Hitter

The outside hitter is also known as the left-side hitter and is the lead attacker in the offensive strategy. To be a successful outsider hitter, you must be able to jump high, be quick on your feet, and be ready to adapt to different situations. The volleyball won’t always be placed where the outsider hitter would like, so they need to be prepared for hits from a variety of places.

Opposite Hitter

Also known as the right-side hitter, these players need to be a perfect balance of both offense and defense. They will also get many opportunities to hit the volleyball, so similar to the outside hitter, jumping ability is vital. The main difference that sets the opposite hitter apart is their defensive responsibility. Being able to receive the serve from the opposing team is just one of the many requirements of this specialized position.

Middle Blocker

The middle blocker, sometimes known as the middle hitter, is the tallest player on the volleyball team. Their main role for the team is being the first line of defense against the opposing team’s hits. The middle blocker needs to read the other team’s attackers to quickly raise his or her arms above the net in a blocking attempt. However, this is not a defense-only position. The middle blocker will have chances for quick points throughout the set.

Libero

The libero can become confusing for non-volleyball players. They can only play on the back row of the court, and because of this, are the ideal person to receive a hit from the opposite team. There are set rules the libero needs to follow, such as not attacking the ball at the net, playing a set for an attacker from the front, and more. You can always tell a libero apart from the rest of the team because they wear a different colored jersey. 

 

For more information on the libero, check out this blog: Why the Libero Is the Most Underrated Player on the Volleyball Court

Defensive Specialist

The thing that sets the defensive specialist apart from other volleyball positions is their ability to substitute out any player on the court. This will count against the team’s total of 12 substitutions. The defensive specialist traditionally focuses on ball control and passing and works well with the libero.

Practice Your Skills at the Hoover Met Complex

Hoover Met Complex wants to help you improve your volleyball skills through tournaments, open gyms, and practices. Knowing these six volleyball positions will help you understand which you specialize in and how you can take the team to the next level. Hoover Met Complex has space in the Finley Center for 17 full-sized volleyball courts for even large scale tournaments. Contact us today for more information! 

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